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Dronies at Regina Public School Construction Sites - Part 1

Topics:   Java Blog

Over the past months, the Java Post Aerial Photography crew has been working on a project for Regina Public School Board, documenting the on-going construction of five new public schools in Regina, Saskatchewan.

On each flight around the five construction sites, we did two passes with two different aerial photography rigs. We did one pass with a "regular" 4K UHD camera rig, and a second pass with a virtual reality "VR" camera rig, consisting of six GoPro cameras - five shooting horizontally and one shooting straight down. In post production, footage from the six separate cameras will be seamed together to create the virtual reality image. To see an example of how footage from this six-camera cluster looks in its raw form, CLICK HERE.

Of course, when you're flying a rig that has six cameras pointing every direction, you're bound to shoot a few "dronies" (like a "selfie," only taken with a drone). Here are a few of the dronies we captured during a shoot in January 2017.

In order for our pilot, Jack, to keep the drone within his line-of-sight during the flight, the best place for our pilot is on the roof of the school. Our Java Post Aerial Photography crew took fall protection training to allow our pilot to safely work on the roof. In the photo above, the drone is still ascending to it's planned flight altitude and you can see the landing gear in the shot. Once the drone gets to the planned altitude, the landing gear will raise up out of the way.

Down below is our ground crew, watching the drone rise into the sky. The black mat is the takeoff point and landing target.

As our drone heads off on it's planned flight path, you can see our pilot standing (safely harnessed and secured) near the edge of the roof.

Flight over, it's time to bring our drone in for a landing. Java Post Aerial Photography secondary pilot/camera operator/UAV tech Trevor uses hand signals to help our primary pilot Jack bring the drone down right in the centre of the landing mat.

Arms straight up means the drone is coming in straight for a gentle touchdown.

To see some examples of the work done by Java Post Aerial Photography, CLICK HERE.

 

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